Blog

CVs, CVs, CVs... It's that time of year again, and the CVs are flying. Winter seasonal work is coming to an end, and spring/summer seasonal work is being advertised. But how do you make your CV stand out from the others?


GCN Task Force update

The Great Crested Newt (GCN) Task Force is an initiative instigated by Defra a couple of years ago, with the aim of improving intelligence on GCN status in the UK, whilst supporting the sustainable development agenda. There are several parallel workstreams, each involving a committee to deliberate and progress aspects of policy and capacity that need improvement. One workstream is defining Favourable Reference Values (FRVs) for example, so that we know what conservation goals we should be aiming for, nationally and locally.


So far, 2015 has all the hallmarks of another busy year. With existing projects being extended, and new jobs coming thick and fast at our Dorset and Nottinghamshire offices, we will most likely be recruiting again soon. New projects on our books this January include:


Amphibian and Reptile Conservation's consultancy arm ARCESL and University of Kent's DICE have teamed up to carry out research and development into predictive modelling of great crested newt (GCN) occurrence in England. The project, commissioned by Natural England, is a follow-up to the Evidence Enhancement Project which ran in 2013 and 2014, delivered by Hyder-Cresswell, CGO Ecology and other partners.



For the next three weeks, CGO Ecology's Director & Principal Ecologist Chris Gleed-Owen will be in Madagascar. The primary reason is to attend the ACSAM2 meeting, which will see a conference of amphibian conservation experts convene to discuss pressing issues in Malagasy amphibian conservation.




As autumn hits us with a rather-wet bang, here is a summary of our current workbook. This month CGO Ecology is working for a range of clients in a variety of sectors: road, rail, minerals, forestry and golf to name a few. Diversity is the key to job satisfaction after all.


Sand lizard capture & the equinoxes

As the days get shorter, this week in late September sees us pass the point of equal day and night length: the autumnal equinox. The spring and autumn equinoxes are busy times for reptiles in northern latitudes with pronounced seasons. The vernal (spring) equinox sees lots of activity following a long winter hibernation period. Males bask to encourage sperm production, then feed to get into breeding condition. Female emergence usually lags behind by a couple of weeks.